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Welcome

The North American Society of Adlerian Psychology's mission is to foster and promote the research, knowledge, training, and application of Adlerian Psychology, maintaining its principles and encouraging its growth. Founded in 1952, NASAP thrives today as a society for a broad spectrum of professionals in the fields of education, psychology, psychiatry, counseling, social work, pastoral care, business, and family education.

NASAP Stands Against Family Separation at the Border

The North American Society of Adlerian Psychology (NASAP) strongly opposes the separation of families
at the southern US border. We stand with other mental health organizations and human welfare
agencies in denouncing this policy because of the lasting trauma it causes to these families. To enact a
policy without any forethought regarding humane treatment for all is considered torture by the Geneva
Convention. The definition follows:

“For the purpose of this Convention, the term "torture" means any act by which severe pain or suffering,
whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from
him, or a third person, information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has
committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for
any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the
instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official
capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in, or incidental to, lawful
sanctions.” (Retrieved from https://www.ohchr.org/EN/ProfessionalInterest/Pages/CAT.aspx)

Adlerian Psychology emphasizes childhood experiences and relationships with family members as crucial
to healthy human development. When these experiences include trauma, such as that being inflicted on
families because of this policy, the impact is lifelong. Children being taken from their parents and placed
in camps without adequate facilities and with no way of contacting loved ones constitutes cruel and
inhumane treatment. Therefore, the members of NASAP are calling for an end to policies that inflict
undue trauma, stress, and harm to families.